Technology is Changing the Automotive Industry

BY: PAMELA STERN AND AMANDA MOSES


The New York International Auto Show (NYIAS) once again parked it’s convention at the Jacob Javits Center in Manhattan from April 19 to April 28. Known to be America’s first and largest auto show, this event earned its infamy by debuting futuristic concept cars, classic editions, cutting edge designs, electric/hybrid models, and modern commuting, traveling, and pleasure vehicles.


On April 17th Ford’s iconic Mustang celebrated 55 years as one of Ford’s original muscle cars. The rich history of this automotive was honored at the auto show with several models on display and a timeline depicting the evolution of its design. The Ford Mustang first made its debut at the NYIAS on April 17, 1964, with a price tag of $2,368. This tough, yet sleek-looking vehicle was so popular that dealers were inundated with purchase requests. Many believe that the Mustang reached true stardom when it was featured on the racetrack as the pace car for the 1964 Indianapolis 500. During the first year the sales were 417,000 and within two years the sales were at one million.


In addition, the Mustang made its appearance on the big screen in the James Bond film, Goldfinger, as a sporty white 1964 convertible. This car has become such an iconic staple of American industrialism that it not only paved its way on the Hollywood stage, but also across record billboards with songs like: Mustang Sally, Wild, Wild Mustang, Go Mustang, Mustang Ford, Chuck Berry’s “My Ford Mustang”, Move Out Little Mustang, Vanilla Ice’s Rolling in My 5.0.

At this year’s auto show, Ford Featured one of their latest designs, a 2019 Fastback Mustang starting at $26,395, which includes a Rear View Camera, TrackApps, LED Headlights, Intelligent Access with Push Button Start, 2.3 L EcoBoost Engine, Independent Rear Suspension, two smart charging USB ports, driver’s knee airbags and many more options to choose from.


Ford was one of over 40 vehicles brands represented at the NYIAS. With so many cars being debuted, some brand representatives chose to highlight the technological advancements their teams have been developing. General Motors’ Chevrolet had a TechStudio setup, which allowed visitors to maneuver a toy car through a maze-like sequence to see how fast they could manually go through the puzzle and park their car against a fully autonomous toy. Attendees were even invited to race through the obstacle course. Other manufactures provided virtual reality demos to showcase the multitude of things that make their cars so amazing. Ford had a VR experience of their All-New Explorer, Toyota allowed riders to have a motion intense demo of their GR Supra, and Volkswagen hooked their actual vehicles to a video game-esque, racing activity.

Guests who were ready for an off-road adventure were able to experience the different types of rough terrain while on the new Jeep Gladiator. Everyone had an opportunity to ride different versions of the Jeep models as it climbed over stairs, rode in an almost 45 degree angle, and up and down a steep incline.


Spring Creek Sun’s (SCS) Amanda Moses and Dean Moses experienced
this first hand. “It felt like a roller coaster ride, but in a vehicle that can
easily be found traversing the New York City streets or across the
Arizona Mountains,” said Amanda Moses, SCS Copy Editor.

You never know what you will experience at the NYIAS. Hyundai revealed their brand new style Sonata, Subaru showcased their Outback crossover design, Genesis impressed attendees with its high-tech Mint show car, and Porsche blew everyone away with its epic return to the iconic look with the 911 Speedster. Many of these cars will be debuting this fall.


Car manufactures introduced not only new tech concepts, but also simple changes like Lexus’ push-in door handle or Porsche Speedster’s (there is no substitute) ignition key is located to the left of the steering wheel (left handed drivers might love this!) and its shaped and colored like a miniature 2-D replica of the car.


Photos by Dean Moses